Mixing – Equalisation

Along with compression, EQ is one of the most powerful tools available to a sound engineer. EQ enables us to alter the tonal characteristics of a sound through cutting or boosting specific aspects of its harmonic content.

So first off…what is EQ? Take a look at this great video tutorial below which will walk you through the basics, within the context of Logic (which is helpful!)

We all love the Dutch Dude Wicke and his fabulous tutorials, this is of the usual high standard and takes a broader overview of using EQ. Also excellent, watch closely..

The Golden Rule of EQ

Boost wide, cut narrow. In other words, if you’re boosting frequencies do it gently across a wide range or you could end up with a very unnatural result. If you’re trying to get rid of an aspect of the sound, do it sharply within a tight frequency range or you may hollow out too much of the sound.

The most important thing to remember is to get a good sound to tape in the first place.

It is generally better to think of EQ as a tool for cutting unwanted frequencies rather than a means to boost parts of the sound. Remember, you cannot add frequencies which are not already there – the most important thing is to make sure your initial recording does not capture a restricted frequency range.

Read the following document to get your understanding of the concept up to speed:

Equalisers explained edited

Then check out these videos for some ideas…

Try this for some tips when you’re looking to solve a specific problem in your mix…

EQ – Which frequencies for which purpose?

Now get to work applying these ideas to your multitrack recordings. Be sure to refer to the Logic User Manual should you need any further guidance.

 

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